Women's lifelong exposure to neighborhood poverty and low birth weight: A population-based study

James W. Collins, Jennifer Wambach, Richard J. David, Kristin M. Rankin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

54 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To determine whether women's lifelong residential environment is associated with infant low birth weight. Methods: We performed race-specific stratified and multivariate binomial regression analyses on an Illinois vital record dataset of non-Latino White and African-American infants (1989-1991) and their mothers (1956-1975) with appended United States census income information. Results: Non-Latino White women (N = 267) with a lifelong residence in low-income neighborhoods had a low birth weight (<2,500 g) incidence of 10.1% vs. 5.1% for White women (N = 10,647) with a lifelong residence in high-income neighborhoods; RR = 2.0 (1.4-2.9). African-American women (N = 18,297) with a lifelong residence in low-income neighborhoods had a low birth weight incidence of 17% vs. 11.7% for African-American women (N = 546) with a lifelong residence in high-income areas; RR = 1.5 (1.2-1.8). The adjusted population attributable risk (PAR) percent of LBW for lifelong residence in low-income neighborhoods was 1.6% for non-Latino White and 23.6% for African-American women. Conclusions: Non-Latino White and African-American women's lifelong residence in low-income neighborhoods is a risk factor for LBW; however, African-Americans experience a greater public health burden from this phenomenon.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)326-333
Number of pages8
JournalMaternal and Child Health Journal
Volume13
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • African-American
  • Low birth weight
  • Poverty
  • Race
  • Weathering

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