Who has higher readmission rates for heart failure, and why? Implications for efforts to improve care using financial incentives

Karen E. Joynt, Ashish K. Jha

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

168 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background-Reducing readmissions for heart failure is an important goal for policymakers. Current national policies financially penalize hospitals with high readmission rates, which may have unintended consequences if these institutions are resource-poor, either financially or clinically. Methods and Results-We analyzed national claims data for Medicare patients with heart failure discharged from US hospitals in 2006 to 2007. We used multivariable models to examine hospital characteristics, 30-day all-cause readmission rates, and likelihood of performing in the worst quartile of readmission rates nationally. Among 905 764 discharges in our sample, patients discharged from public hospitals (27.9%) had higher readmission rates than nonprofit hospitals (25.7%, P<0.001), as did patients discharged from hospitals in counties with low median income (29.4%) compared with counties with high median income (25.7%, P<0.001). Patients discharged from hospitals without cardiac services (27.2%) had higher readmission rates than those from hospitals with full cardiac services (25.1%, P<0.001); patients discharged from hospitals in the lowest quartile of nurse staffing (28.5%) had higher readmission rates than those from hospitals in the highest quartile (25.4%, P<0.001). Patients discharged from small hospitals (28.4%) had higher readmission rates than those discharged from large hospitals (25.2%, P<0.001). These same characteristics identified hospitals that were likely to perform in the worst quartile nationally. Conclusions-Given that many poor-performing hospitals also have fewer resources, they may suffer disproportionately from financial penalties for high readmission rates. As we seek to improve care for patients with heart failure, we should ensure that penalties for poor performance do not worsen disparities in quality of care.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)53-59
Number of pages7
JournalCirculation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes
Volume4
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Heart failure
  • Outcomes research
  • Quality of care
  • Readmissions

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