Which U.S. medical graduates plan to become specialty-board certified? Analysis of the 1997-2004 National Association of American Medical Colleges graduation questionnaire database

Donna B. Jeffe, Dorothy A. Andriole, Rajeev K. Sabharwal, Anthony M. Paolo, Kimberly Ephgrave, Heather L. Hageman, Angela Nuzzarello, Paul J. Jones, Alison J. Whelan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Predictors of U.S. allopathic medical-school graduates' board-certification plans have not been characterized. Method: Using multivariable logistic regression, graduates' responses to 11 questions on the 1997-2004 Association of American Medical Colleges Graduation Questionnaire were analyzed to identify independent predictors of plans for specialty-board certification. Results: The proportion of 108,408 graduates planning specialty-board certification decreased from 97.3% in 1997 to 88.4% in 2004. Among 101,805 (93.9%) graduates with complete data, graduates who were Hispanic, rated their clinical clerkships, quality of medical education, and confidence in clinical skills more highly, had any debt, and planned "University- faculty" careers were more likely to plan becoming board certified. Females, Asians/Pacific Islanders, and graduates who planned to practice in underserved areas, planned "other" nonclinical-practice careers, and graduated with MD/other (non-PhD) degrees were less likely to plan becoming board certified. Conclusion: Specialty-board certification does not appear to be among the professional goals for a growing proportion of U.S. medical graduates.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)S98-S102
JournalAcademic Medicine
Volume81
Issue number10 SUPPL.
DOIs
StatePublished - 2006

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