Voluntary orienting is dissociated from target detection in human posterior parietal cortex

Maurizio Corbetta, J. Michelle Kincade, John M. Ollinger, Marc P. McAvoy, Gordon L. Shulman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1342 Scopus citations

Abstract

Human ability to attend to visual stimuli based on their spatial locations requires the parietal cortex. One hypothesis maintains that parietal cortex controls the voluntary orienting of attention toward a location of interest. Another hypothesis emphasizes its role in reorienting attention toward visual targets appearing at unattended locations. Here, using event-related functional magnetic resonance (ER-fMRI), we show that distinct parietal regions mediated these different attentional processes. Cortical activation occurred primarily in the intraparietal sulcus when a location was attended before visual-target presentation, but in the right temporoparietal junction when the target was detected, particularly at an unattended location.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)292-297
Number of pages6
JournalNature neuroscience
Volume3
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2000

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