Volumetric Quantitative Computed Tomography Measurement Precision for Volumes and Densities of Tarsal and Metatarsal Bones

Paul K. Commean, Jared A. Kennedy, Karen A. Bahow, Charles F. Hildebolt, Lu Liu, Kirk E. Smith, Mary K. Hastings, Tao Ju, Fred W. Prior, David R. Sinacore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Diabetic foot diseases, such as ulcerations, infections, and neuropathic (Charcot's) arthropathy, are major complications of diabetes mellitus (DM) and peripheral neuropathy (PN) and may cause osteolysis (bone loss) in foot bones. The purposes of our study were to make computed tomography (CT) measurements of foot-bone volumes and densities and to determine measurement precision (percent coefficients of variation for root-mean-square standard deviations) and least significant changes (LSCs) in these percentages that could be considered biologically real with 95% confidence. Volumetric quantitative CT scans were performed and repeated on 10 young healthy subjects and 13 subjects with DM and PN. Two raters used the original- and repeat-scan data sets to make measurements of volumes and bone mineral densities (BMDs) of the tarsal and metatarsal bones of the 2 feet (24 bones). Precisions for the bones ranged from 0.1% to 0.9% for volume measurements and from 0.6% to 1.9% for BMD measurements. The LSCs ranged from 0.4% to 2.5% for volume measurements and from 1.5% to 5.4% for BMD measurements. Volumetric quantitative CT provides precise measurements of volume and BMD for metatarsal and tarsal bones, where diabetic foot diseases commonly occur.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)313-320
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Clinical Densitometry
Volume14
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2011

Keywords

  • Bone mineral density
  • Diabetes mellitus
  • Foot
  • Peripheral neuropathy
  • Precision
  • Whole bone volume

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Volumetric Quantitative Computed Tomography Measurement Precision for Volumes and Densities of Tarsal and Metatarsal Bones'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this