Vestibular Function and Beta-Amyloid Deposition in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging

Rebecca J. Kamil, Murat Bilgel, Dean F. Wong, Susan M. Resnick, Yuri Agrawal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Beta-amyloid (Aβ) plaque deposition is a key feature of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), and occurs years before the onset of symptoms. Aβ plaque deposition has been shown to be present in ~30% of cognitively normal older adults using amyloid C-11 labeled Pittsburgh Compound B (11C-PiB) Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging. Prior studies have reported a link between reduced vestibular function and poorer cognition in healthy older adults. It is unknown whether vestibular impairment occurs in association with AD pathology among individuals in the preclinical phase of AD, which could contribute to the observed association between vestibular and cognitive function in healthy older adults. Using the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA), we analyzed the association between a comprehensive set of vestibular function measures and PiB status in 98 healthy participants with a mean age of 77.3 (±8.26). We did not observe a significant relationship between any vestibular function measure and PiB status in cognitively-intact older adults in the BLSA. This finding suggests that Aβ deposition does not explain the observed association between reduced vestibular function and poorer cognition in healthy older adults.

Original languageEnglish
Article number408
JournalFrontiers in Aging Neuroscience
Volume10
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 11 2018

Keywords

  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • beta-amyloid
  • BLSA
  • older adults
  • PET
  • PiB
  • Pittsburgh compound B
  • vestibular function

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