Verbal Adynamia and Conceptualization in Partial Rhombencephalosynapsis and Corpus Callosum Dysgenesis

Megan S. Barker, Jacquelyn L. Knight, Ryan J. Dean, Simone Mandelstam, Linda J. Richards, Gail A. Robinson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Verbal adynamia is characterized by markedly reduced spontaneous speech that is not attributable to a core language deficit such as impaired naming, reading, repetition, or comprehension. In some cases, verbal adynamia is severe enough to be considered dynamic aphasia. We report the case of a 40-year-old, left-handed, male native English speaker who presented with partial rhombencephalosynapsis, corpus callosum dysgenesis, and a language profile that is consistent with verbal adynamia, or subclinical dynamic aphasia, possibly underpinned by difficulties selecting and generating ideas for expression. This case is only the second investigation of dynamic aphasia in an individual with a congenital brain malformation. It is also the first detailed neuropsychological report of an adult with partial rhombencephalosynapsis and corpus callosum dysgenesis, and the only known case of superior intellectual abilities in this context.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)38-52
Number of pages15
JournalCognitive and Behavioral Neurology
Volume34
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 3 2021

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