Utility of a genetic risk score to predict recurrent cardiovascular events 1 year after an acute coronary syndrome: A pooled analysis of the RISCA, PRAXY, and TRIUMPH cohorts

Christopher Labos, Sara C. Martinez, Rui Hao Leo Wang, Petra A. Lenzini, Louise Pilote, Peter Bogaty, James M. Brophy, James C. Engert, Sharon Cresci, George Thanassoulis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Limited evidence exists regarding the utility of genetic risk scores (GRS) in predicting recurrent cardiovascular events after acute coronary syndrome (ACS). We sought to determine whether a GRS would predict early recurrent cardiovascular events within 1 year of ACS. Methods & Results: Participants admitted with acute coronary syndromes from the RISCA, PRAXY, and TRIUMPH cohorts, were genotyped for 30 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) or myocardial infarction (MI) in prior genome wide association studies. A 30 SNP CAD/MI GRS was constructed. The primary endpoint was defined as all-cause mortality, recurrent ACS or cardiac re-hospitalization within 1 year of ACS admission. Results across all cohorts for the 30 SNP CAD/MI GRS were pooled using a random-effects model. There were 1040 patients from the RISCA cohort, 691 patients from the PRAXY cohort, and 1772 patients from the TRIUMPH cohort included in the analysis and 389 occurrences of the primary endpoint of recurrent events at 1-year post-ACS. In unadjusted and fully adjusted analyses, a 30 SNP GRS was not significantly associated with recurrent events (HR per allele 0.97 (95%CI 0.91-1.03) for RISCA, HR 0.99 (95%CI 0.93-1.05) for PRAXY, 0.98 (95%CI 0.94-1.02) for TRIUMPH, and 0.98 (95%CI 0.95-1.01) for the pooled analysis). Addition of this GRS to the GRACE risk model did not significantly improve risk prediction. Conclusion: The 30 MI SNP GRS was not associated with recurrent events 1-year post ACS in pooled analyses across cohorts and did not improve risk discrimination or reclassification indices. Our results suggest that the genetic etiology of early events post-ACS may differ from later events.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)261-267
Number of pages7
JournalAtherosclerosis
Volume242
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2015

Keywords

  • Acute coronary syndrome
  • Genetic risk score
  • Risk prediction

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