Using a Patient Decision Aid Video to Assess Current and Former Smokers’ Values About the Harms and Benefits of Lung Cancer Screening With Low-Dose Computed Tomography

Aubri S. Hoffman, Andrea P. Hempstead, Ashley J. Housten, Vincent F. Richards, Lisa M. Lowenstein, Viola B. Leal, Robert J. Volk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background. Recent policy changes require discussing the potential benefits and harms of lung cancer screening with low-dose computed tomography. This study explored how current and former smokers value potential benefits and harms after watching a patient decision aid, and their screening intentions. Methods. Current or former smokers (quit within 15 years) with no history of lung cancer watched the decision aid and responded to items assessing the value of potential benefits and harms in their decision making, and their screening intentions. Results. After viewing the decision aid, participants (n = 30; mean age 61.5 years, mean 30.4 pack-year history) were well-informed (mean 80.5% correct responses) and rated anticipated regret and finding cancer early as highly important in their decision (medians >9 out of 10), along with moderate but variable concerns about false positives, overdiagnosis, and radiation exposure (medians 7.0, 6.0, and 5.0, respectively). Most participants (90.0% to 96.7%) felt clear about how they personally valued the potential benefits and harms and prepared for decision making (mean 86.7 out of 100, SD = 21.3). After viewing the decision aid, most participants (90%) intended to discuss screening with their doctor. Limitations. The study is limited to current and former smokers enrolled in a tobacco treatment program, and it may not generalize to other patient populations. Conclusions. The majority of current and former smokers were strongly concerned about anticipated regret and finding cancer early, while concerns about radiation exposure, false positives, and overdiagnosis were variable. After viewing the decision aid, current and former smokers reported strong preparedness and intentions to talk with their doctor about lung cancer screening with low-dose computed tomography.

Original languageEnglish
JournalMDM Policy and Practice
Volume3
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

Keywords

  • decision making
  • decision support
  • lung neoplasms
  • smokers
  • tomography x-ray computed

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