Trust in Sources of Advice about Infant Care Practices: The SAFE Study

Sunah S. Hwang, Denis V. Rybin, Timothy C. Heeren, Eve R. Colson, Michael J. Corwin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives (1) Determine the prevalence of maternal trust in advice sources on infant care practices; (2) Investigate the association of maternal and infant characteristics with trust in advice sources on infant care practices. Methods Using probability sampling methods, we recruited mothers from 32 U.S. maternity hospitals with oversampling of Black and Hispanic women resulting in a nationally representative sample of mothers of infants aged 2–6 months. Survey questions assessed maternal trust in advice sources (physicians, nurses, family, friends, and media) regarding infant care practices including infant sleep practices (sleep position, bed sharing, and pacifier use), feeding, and vaccination. Weighted frequencies of maternal trust in advice sources were calculated to obtain prevalence estimates. Multivariable logistic regression was used to assess the association of maternal and infant characteristics with maternal trust in advice sources. Results Mothers had the greatest trust in doctors for advice on all infant care practices (56–89 %), while trust was lowest for friends (13–22 %) and the media (10–14 %). In the adjusted analyses, there were significant associations of maternal race/ethnicity, education, and age with trust in advice sources. Conclusions for Practice Maternal trust in advice about infant care practices varied significantly by source. A better understanding of which advice sources are most trusted by mothers, as well as the factors associated with maternal trust, may guide the development of more effective strategies to improve adherence to health promoting infant care practices.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1956-1964
Number of pages9
JournalMaternal and Child Health Journal
Volume20
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Advice
  • Consumer health information
  • Health behavior
  • Health promotion
  • Infant care practices
  • Preventive health services
  • Trust

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Trust in Sources of Advice about Infant Care Practices: The SAFE Study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this