Treatment Patterns and Overall Survival Outcomes of Octogenarians with Muscle Invasive Cancer of the Bladder: An Analysis of the National Cancer Database

Benjamin W. Fischer-Valuck, Yuan James Rao, Soumon Rudra, Daniel Przybysz, Elizabeth Germino, Pamela Samson, Brian C. Baumann, Hiram Gay, Jeff Michalski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

31 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose Elderly patients with muscle invasive bladder cancer can pose a therapeutic dilemma, given multiple comorbidities which may preclude surgery. In this registry based analysis we investigated treatment patterns and survival outcomes in this group of patients. Materials and Methods We queried the National Cancer Database for muscle invasive (cT2-T4aN0M0) bladder cancer in patients 80 years old or older who were diagnosed from 2004 to 2013. Patients included in study underwent transurethral resection of bladder tumor followed by radical cystectomy, radical cystectomy plus chemotherapy, radiation therapy alone, chemotherapy alone, chemoradiation or no treatment. We performed Kaplan-Meier, log rank and multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression and propensity score matching. Results A total of 9,270 patients were identified with a median followup of 12.8 months. Median overall survival in patients treated with radical cystectomy alone was 23.2 months (95% CI 19.8–26.6), which was superior to that of chemotherapy alone or radiation therapy alone (p <0.0001). Those treated with chemoradiation had a median overall survival of 27.3 months (95% CI 25.0–29.7), which did not statistically differ from that of radical cystectomy alone (p = 0.39). Surgery plus chemotherapy showed the longest median overall survival of 34.5 months (95% CI 22.2–46.7, vs chemoradiation and radical cystectomy alone p <0.0001). On multivariate analysis and propensity score matching the best overall survival was seen in patients treated with surgery plus chemotherapy and there was no difference in overall survival between chemoradiation and radical cystectomy alone. Conclusions In elderly patients with muscle invasive bladder cancer chemoradiation is an alternative definitive treatment strategy with survival equal to that of surgery alone and superior to that of chemotherapy alone or radiation therapy alone. If a patient was able to receive neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy with surgery, additional survival was observed in this nonrandomized study.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)416-423
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Urology
Volume199
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2018

Keywords

  • aged
  • chemoradiotherapy
  • cystectomy
  • mortality
  • urinary bladder neoplasms

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