Treatment of localized periodontal disease in pregnancy does not reduce the occurrence of preterm birth: results from the Periodontal Infections and Prematurity Study (PIPS)

George A. Macones, Samuel Parry, Deborah B. Nelson, Jerome F. Strauss, Jack Ludmir, Arnold W. Cohen, David M. Stamilio, Dina Appleby, Bonnie Clothier, Mary D. Sammel, Marjorie Jeffcoat

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114 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: The purpose of this study was to test whether treating periodontal disease (PD) in pregnancy will reduce the incidence of spontaneous preterm delivery (SPTD) at ≤35 weeks of gestation. Study Design: A multicenter, randomized clinical trial was performed. Subjects with PD were randomized to scaling and root planing (active) or tooth polishing (control). The primary outcome was the occurrence of SPTD at <35 weeks of gestation. Results: We screened 3563 subjects for PD; the prevalence of PD was 50%. Seven hundred fifty-seven subjects were assigned randomly; 378 subjects were assigned to the active group, and 379 subjects were assigned to the placebo group. Active treatment did not reduce the risk of SPTD at <35 weeks of gestation (relative risk, 1.19; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.62-2.28) or composite neonatal morbidity (relative risk, 1.30; 95% CI, 0.83-2.04). There was a suggestion of an increase in the risk of indicated SPTD at <35 weeks of gestation in those subjects who received active treatment (relative risk, 3.01; 95% CI, 0.95-4.24). Conclusion: Treating periodontal disease does not reduce the incidence of SPTD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)147.e1-147.e8
JournalAmerican journal of obstetrics and gynecology
Volume202
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2010

Keywords

  • periodontal disease
  • spontaneous preterm delivery

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