Toward a smart pavement monitoring system

Nizar Lajnef, Karim Chatti, Shantanu Chakrabartty, Fred Faridazar

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Technology for the monitoring of pavement condition does not appear to have kept pace with other technological improvement over the past several years. Research and development are underway to advance the monitoring of pavement condition to provide better relationships among distresses, performance, traffic, maintenance, and other significant variables. Presently, two approaches are typically taken to monitor the condition of pavements: Manual distress surveys and automated condition surveys using specially equipped vehicles (e. g imaging technology for distress survey and transverse profiling for the wheel path rutting). However, these monitoring approaches remain rather reactive than proactive in terms of detecting damage, since they merely record the distress that has already appeared. Other testing approaches are also used (e. g. deflection testing). However, most of these methods either require significant personnel time or the use of costly equipment. Thus they can only be used cost-effectively on a periodic and/or localized basis. Currently, pavement instrumentation for condition monitoring is done on a localized and short term basis. The current technology does not allow for continuous long-term monitoring and the deployment of existing systems on a network level remains unfeasible due to cost, unease of installation and data collection techniques. Long term monitoring of mechanical loading for pavement structures could reduce maintenance cost, improve longevity, enhance safety, and advance research in pavement design and construction operation. In this paper we discuss the limitations of existing monitoring sensors and the challenges needed to overcome in order to achieve efficient monitoring on a network level. On-going research to develop a smart pavement monitoring system is described. The system consists of a novel self-powered wireless sensor based on the integration of piezoelectric transduction with floating gate avalanche injection and capable of detecting, storing and transmitting strain history for longterm monitoring, a novel passive temperature gauge, a load cell and a moisture gauge based on existing technologies. Preliminary laboratory results from a fabricated prototype of the strain sensor indicate that the device can compute cumulative statistics of electrical signals generated by the piezoelectric transducer for strain cycles that simulate input loads experienced in pavement structures.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationStructural Health Monitoring of Intelligent Infrastructure - Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Structural Health Monitoring of Intelligent Infrastructure, SHMII 2009
StatePublished - 2009
Event4th International Conference on Structural Health Monitoring of Intelligent Infrastructure, SHMII 2009 - Zurich, Switzerland
Duration: Jul 22 2009Jul 24 2009

Publication series

NameStructural Health Monitoring of Intelligent Infrastructure - Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Structural Health Monitoring of Intelligent Infrastructure, SHMII 2009

Conference

Conference4th International Conference on Structural Health Monitoring of Intelligent Infrastructure, SHMII 2009
Country/TerritorySwitzerland
CityZurich
Period07/22/0907/24/09

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