Time-resolved fluorescence polarization anisotropy and optical imaging of Cybesin in cancerous and normal prostate tissues

Y. Pu, W. B. Wang, S. Achilefu, B. B. Das, G. C. Tang, V. Sriramoju, R. R. Alfano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Scopus citations

Abstract

Time-resolved polarization-dependent fluorescence of Cybesin in solution and in cancerous and normal prostate tissues were measured. The polarization preservation property of Cybesin in tissue was observed. The fluorescence intensity emitted from a Cybesin-stained cancerous tissue area was found to be much stronger than that from a Cybesin-stained normal tissue area indicating that cancerous prostate tissue takes-up more Cybesin than normal tissue. The polarization anisotropy of Cybesin contained in cancerous prostate tissue was found to be larger than that of Cybesin in normal prostate tissue indicating that a larger degree of polarization was preserved in the Cybesin-stained cancerous tissue due to structures. A static anisotropy component from the emission of cell-bonded Cybesin molecules in tissue and a time-dependent anisotropy component from the emission of un-bonded Cybesin molecules were determined and discussed. The static anisotropy value of Cybesin in stained cancerous tissue was found to be much larger than that in stained normal tissue. The fluorescence polarization difference imaging technique based on the polarization preservation of Cybesin was used to enhance the image contrast between cancerous and normal prostate tissue areas.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)260-267
Number of pages8
JournalOptics Communications
Volume274
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2007

Keywords

  • Fluorescence polarization difference imaging
  • Polarization anisotropy
  • Polarization preservation
  • Prostate cancer receptor-targeted contrast agent
  • Time-resolved fluorescence polarization kinetics

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