The wrinkling of time: Aging, inflammation, oxidative stress, and the circadian clock in neurodegeneration

Brian V. Lananna, Erik S. Musiek

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

37 Scopus citations

Abstract

A substantial body of research now implicates the circadian clock in the regulation of an array of diverse biological processes including glial function, metabolism, peripheral immune responses, and redox homeostasis. Sleep abnormalities and other forms of circadian disruption are common symptoms of aging and neurodegeneration. Circadian clock disruption may also influence the aging processes and the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. The specific mechanisms governing the interaction between circadian systems, aging, and the immune system are still being uncovered. Here, we review the evidence supporting a bidirectional relationship between aging and the circadian system. Further, we explore the hypothesis that age-related circadian deterioration may exacerbate multiple pathogenic processes, priming the brain for neurodegeneration.

Original languageEnglish
Article number104832
JournalNeurobiology of Disease
Volume139
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2020

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Circadian clock
  • Neurodegeneration
  • Neuroinflammation
  • Oxidative stress

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The wrinkling of time: Aging, inflammation, oxidative stress, and the circadian clock in neurodegeneration'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this