The use of incentive spirometry in pediatric patients with sickle cell disease to reduce the incidence of acute chest syndrome

Fahd A. Ahmad, Charles G. MacIas, Joseph Y. Allen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction: To determine if incentive spirometry (IS) in pediatric patients admitted with sickle cell disease for nonrespiratory complaints will decrease acute chest syndrome (ACS). Methods: This was an Institutional Review Board-approved before-after 2-year retrospective cohort study evaluating an evidence-based guideline (EBG) initiating mandatory IS in admitted pediatric sickle cell patients from a tertiary children's emergency center. Student t testing and χ2 analysis were performed. Results: There were 1551 patient visits. About 258 visits were enrolled in the pre-EBG year, and 230 in the EBG year. Between year characteristics were similar. The EBG year reported higher use of hydroxyurea (P<0.01), analgesics (P=0.02), and chest pain (P=0.03). Sixty-seven patients (25.9%) in the pre-EBG year received transfusions versus 51 (22.5%) in the EBG year (NS). Twenty-five (9.6%) of the pre-EBG patients received blood for ACS versus 14 (6.1%) in the EBG group (absolute risk reduction: 3.5%, 95% confidence interval: -1-8.4%). Subgroup analysis revealed that patients who presented with back pain experienced a significant decrease in the development of ACS in the EBG year (P=0.04, absolute risk reduction: 14%, 95% confidence interval: 1-28%, number needed to treat: 8). Conclusion: Mandatory IS for sickle cell disease patients admitted without respiratory complaints reduces transfusions and ACS, particularly for those presenting with back pain.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)415-420
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology
Volume33
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2011

Keywords

  • acute chest syndrome
  • emergency department
  • incentive spirometry
  • sickle cell disease

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