The Trp64Arg polymorphism of the β3-adrenergic receptor gene is not associated with training-induced changes in body composition: The HERITAGE Family Study

Christophe Garenc, Louis Pérusse, Tuomo Rankinen, Jacques Gagnon, Arthur S. Leon, James S. Skinner, Jack H. Wilmore, D. C. Rao, Claude Bouchard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To investigate the association between the Trp64Arg polymorphism of the β3-adrenergic receptor gene and changes in body composition in response to endurance training. Research Methods and Procedures: Adult sedentary white and black subjects participating in the HERITAGE Family Study were measured before and after 20 weeks on endurance training for the body mass index, fat mass, percentage of body fat, fat-free mass, sum of eight skinfolds, and subcutaneous, visceral, and total abdominal fat areas. The association between the Trp64Arg polymorphism and the response phenotypes, computed as the difference between pre-and post-training values, was tested by analysis of covariance separately in men and women. The gene by race interaction term was also tested. Results: No race differences were observed for allelic and genotype frequencies. Training resulted in significant reduction of body fat in both men and women. No association of the Trp64Arg polymorphism was observed with training-induced changes for any of the body composition phenotypes in both men and women. Discussion: These results suggest that the Trp64Arg polymorphism of the β3-adrenergic receptor gene is not related to changes in body composition in response to exercise training.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)337-341
Number of pages5
JournalObesity research
Volume9
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2001

Keywords

  • Abdominal fat
  • Body composition
  • Endurance training
  • Trp64arg polymorphism
  • β3-adrenergic receptor gene

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