The Sur7p family defines novel cortical domains in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, affects sphingolipid metabolism, and is involved in sporulation

Michael E. Young, Tatiana S. Karpova, Britta Brügger, Darcy M. Moschenross, Georgeann K. Wang, Roger Schneiter, Felix T. Wieland, John A. Cooper

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

92 Scopus citations

Abstract

We have discovered a novel cortical patch structure in Saccharomyces cerevisiae defined by a family of integral plasma membrane proteins, including Sur7p, Ynl194p, and Ydl222p. Sur7p-family patches localized as cortical patches that were immobile and stable. These patches were polarized to regions of the cell with a mature cell wall; they were absent from small buds and the tips of many medium-sized buds. These patches were distinct from other known cortical structures. Digestion of the cell wall caused Sur7p patches to disassemble, indicating that Sur7p requires cell wall-dependent extracellular interactions for its localization as patches. sur7Δ ydl222Δ, and ynl194Δ mutants had reduced sporulation efficiencies. SUR7 was originally described as a multicopy suppressor of rvs167, whose product is an actin patch component. This suppression is probably mediated by sphingolipids, since deletion of SUR7, YDL222, and YNL194 altered the sphingolipid content of the yeast plasma membrane, and other SUR genes suppress rvs167 via effects on sphingolipid synthesis. In particular, the sphingoid base length and number of hydroxyl groups in inositolphosphorylceramides were altered in sur7Δ, ydl222Δ, and yne194Δ strains.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)927-934
Number of pages8
JournalMolecular and cellular biology
Volume22
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002

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