The role of serotonin in the antidyskinetic effects of deep brain stimulation: Focus on antipsychotic-induced motor symptoms

Meaghan C. Creed, Jose N. Nobrega

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Treatment with the classic antipsychotic drugs (APDs), such as haloperidol (HAL), is associated with both acute and chronic motor side effects. Acutely, these drugs may induce extrapyramidal symptoms, whereas a prolonged treatment may result in tardive dyskinesia (TD). Atypical antipsychotics have a lower incidence of motor side effects, which have been partially ascribed to the antagonism of serotonin (5-HT) receptors. Although there is currently no satisfactory pharmacotherapy for TD, deep brain stimulation (DBS) has emerged as a promising therapy. However, the mechanisms underlying its effects remain largely unknown. DBS has been shown to affect several neurotransmitter systems, including 5-HT. In this review, we outline the involvement of 5-HT in the development of HAL-induced catalepsy and TD. We also discuss the evidence for DBS-induced alterations in 5-HT function and the relevance of serotonergic alterations to the antidyskinetic effects of DBS. The evidence suggests that the serotonergic mechanisms may be involved in the acute and chronic motor side effects of APDs as well as in adverse psychiatric effects that have been reported following DBS. However, the current evidence suggests that 5-HT alterations do not play an important role in the effectiveness of DBS in models of dyskinesias induced by chronic APDs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)153-166
Number of pages14
JournalReviews in the Neurosciences
Volume24
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2013

Keywords

  • Catalepsy
  • Dopamine
  • Haloperidol
  • Highfrequency stimulation
  • Tardive dyskinesia

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The role of serotonin in the antidyskinetic effects of deep brain stimulation: Focus on antipsychotic-induced motor symptoms'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this