The role of microglia and macrophages in glioma maintenance and progression

Dolores Hambardzumyan, David H. Gutmann, Helmut Kettenmann

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

351 Scopus citations

Abstract

There is a growing recognition that gliomas are complex tumors composed of neoplastic and non-neoplastic cells, which each individually contribute to cancer formation, progression and response to treatment. The majority of the non-neoplastic cells are tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), either of peripheral origin or representing brain-intrinsic microglia, that create a supportive stroma for neoplastic cell expansion and invasion. TAMs are recruited to the glioma environment, have immune functions, and can release a wide array of growth factors and cytokines in response to those factors produced by cancer cells. In this manner, TAMs facilitate tumor proliferation, survival and migration. Through such iterative interactions, a unique tumor ecosystem is established, which offers new opportunities for therapeutic targeting.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)20-27
Number of pages8
JournalNature neuroscience
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 29 2015

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