The representations of reach endpoints in posterior parietal cortex depend on which hand does the reaching

Steve W.C. Chang, Lawrence H. Snyder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Neurons in the parietal reach region (PRR) have been implicated in the sensory-to-motor transformation required for reaching toward visually defined targets. The neurons in each cortical hemisphere might be specifically involved in planning movements of just one limb, or the PRR might code reach endpoints generically, independent of which limb will actually move. Previous work has shown that the preferred directions of PRR neurons are similar for right and left limb movements but that the amplitude of modulation may vary greatly. We now test the hypothesis that frames of reference and eye and hand gain field modulations will, like preferred directions, be independent of which hand moves. This was not the case. Many neurons show clear differences in both the frame of reference as well as in direction and strength of gain field modulations, depending on which hand is used to reach. The results suggest that the information that is conveyed from the PRR to areas closer to the motor output (the readout from the PRR) is different for each limb and that individual PRR neurons contribute either to controlling the contralateral-limb or else bimanual-limb control.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2352-2365
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of neurophysiology
Volume107
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2012

Keywords

  • Contralateral- and ipsilateral-limb specificity
  • Parietal reach region
  • Reference frame
  • Sensorimotor transformation

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