The Patient Voice: Stent Experiences After Ureteroscopy - Insights from In-Depth Interviews with Participants in the USDRN STENTS Nested Qualitative Cohort Study

Amy Corneli, Carrie Dombeck, Kevin McKenna, Jonathan D. Harper, Jodi A. Antonelli, Alana C. Desai, H. Henry Lai, Gregory E. Tasian, Justin Ziemba, Rebecca McCune, Brooke Piskator, Hussein R. Al-Khalidi, Naim M. Maalouf, Peter P. Reese, Hunter Wessells, Ziya Kirkali, Charles D. Scales

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: Ureteral stents are commonly used after ureteroscopy and cause significant discomfort, yet qualitative perspectives on patients' stent experiences remain unknown. We describe psychological, functional, and interpersonal effects of post-ureteroscopy stents and whether additional patient-reported assessments may be needed. Materials and Methods: Using a qualitative descriptive study design, we conducted in-depth interviews with a nested cohort of participants in the STudy to Enhance uNderstanding of sTent-associated Symptoms (STENTS). Participants shared their symptoms with a post-ureteroscopy stent and described symptom bother and impact on daily activities. All interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using applied thematic analysis. During analysis, participants' experiences with interference in daily activities were categorized into three groups based on their impact: minimal, moderate, and substantial. Results: All 39 participants experienced pain, although descriptions varied and differentiated between feelings of pain vs discomfort. Almost all experienced urinary symptoms. Only a few reported other physical symptoms, although several psychological aspects were identified. In the areas of sleep, mood, life enjoyment, work, exercise, activities of daily living, driving, childcare, and leisure/social activities, the stent had little impact on daily living among participants placed in the minimal group (n = 12) and far greater impact for participants in the substantial group (n = 8). For patients in the moderate group (n = 19), some daily activities were moderately or substantially affected, whereas other activities were minimally affected. Conclusions: Counseling to better prepare patients for the impact of stent-associated symptoms may help mitigate symptom burden. While existing instruments adequately cover most symptoms, additional assessments for other domains, particularly psychological factors, may be needed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)642-653
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Endourology
Volume37
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2023

Keywords

  • qualitative research
  • quality of life
  • ureteral stent
  • ureteroscopy
  • urinary stone disease

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