The mammalian cone visual cycle promotes rapid M/L-cone pigment regeneration independently of the interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein

Alexander V. Kolesnikov, Peter H. Tang, Ryan O. Parker, Rosalie K. Crouch, Vladimir J. Kefalov

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

51 Scopus citations

Abstract

Rapid regeneration of the visual pigment following its photoactivation is critical for the function of cone photoreceptors throughout the day. Though the reactions of the visual cycle in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) that recycle chromophore for rod pigment regeneration are well characterized, the corresponding mechanisms that enable rapid regeneration of cone pigment are poorly understood. A key remaining question is the relative contribution of the recently discovered cone-specific retina visual cycle and the classic RPEdependent visual cycle to mammalian cone pigment regeneration. In addition, it is not clear what role, if any, the abundant interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein (IRBP) presumed to facilitate the traffic of chromophore, plays in accelerating mammalian cone pigment regeneration. To address these issues, we used transretinal recordings to evaluate M/L-cone pigment regeneration in isolated retinas and eyecups from control and IRBP-deficient mice. Remarkably, the mouse retina promoted M/L-cone dark adaptation eightfold faster than the RPE. However, complete cone recovery required both visual cycles. We conclude that the retina visual cycle is critical for the initial rapid regeneration of mouse M/L-cone pigment during dark adaptation, whereas the slower RPE visual cycle is required to complete the process. While the deletion of IRBP reduced the amplitude and slowed the kinetics ofmouseM/L-cone photoresponses, cone adaptation in bright, steady light and the kinetics of cone dark adaptation were not affected in isolated retina or in intact eyecup. Thus, IRBP does not accelerate cone pigment regeneration and is not critical for the function of mouse M/L-cones in bright light.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)7900-7909
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Neuroscience
Volume31
Issue number21
DOIs
StatePublished - May 25 2011

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