The human X-linked steroid sulfatase gene and a Y-encoded pseudogene: Evidence for an inversion of the Y chromosome during primate evolution

Pauline H. Yen, Birgit Marsh, Elizabeth Allen, Siao Ping Tsai, Jay Ellison, Lynn Connolly, Katherine Neiswanger, Larry J. Shapiro

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    161 Scopus citations

    Abstract

    The mammalian X and Y chromosomes are thought to have evolved from a common, nearly homologous chromosome pair. Although there is little sequence similarity between the mouse or the human X and Y, there are several regions in which moderate to extensive sequence homologies have been found, including, but not limited to, the so-called pseudoautosomal segment, in which X-Y pairing and recombination take place. The steroid sulfatase gene is in the psuedoautosomal region of the mouse, but not in man. We have cloned and characterized the human STS X-encoded locus and a pseudogene that is present on the long arm of the Y chromosome. Our data in humans and other primates suggest that there has been a pericentric inversion of the Y chromosome during primate evolution that has disrupted the former pseudoautosomal arrangement of these genes. These results provide additional insight into the evolution of the sex chromosomes and into the nature of this interesting portion of the human genome.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1123-1135
    Number of pages13
    JournalCell
    Volume55
    Issue number6
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Dec 23 1988

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The human X-linked steroid sulfatase gene and a Y-encoded pseudogene: Evidence for an inversion of the Y chromosome during primate evolution'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Yen, P. H., Marsh, B., Allen, E., Tsai, S. P., Ellison, J., Connolly, L., Neiswanger, K., & Shapiro, L. J. (1988). The human X-linked steroid sulfatase gene and a Y-encoded pseudogene: Evidence for an inversion of the Y chromosome during primate evolution. Cell, 55(6), 1123-1135. https://doi.org/10.1016/0092-8674(88)90257-7