The genetic and environmental relationship between the interpersonal sensitivity measure (IPSM) and the personality dimensions of Eysenck and Cloninger

Nathan A. Gillespie, Stuart J. Johnstone, Philip Boyce, Andrew C. Heath, Nicholas G. Martin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

A shortened version of the Interpersonal Sensitivity Measure (IPSM) developed to predict depression prone personalities was administered in a self-report questionnaire to a community-based sample of 3269 Australian twin pairs aged 18-28 years, along with Eysenck's EPQ and Cloninger's TPQ. The IPSM included four sub-scales: Separation Anxiety (SEP); Interpersonal Sensitivity (INT); Fragile Inner-Self (FIS); and Timidity (TIM). Univariate analysis revealed that individual differences in the IPSM sub-scale scores were best explained by additive genetic and specific environmental effects. Confirming previous research findings, familial aggregation for the EPQ and TPQ personality dimensions was entirely due to additive genetic effects. In the multivariate case, a model comprising additive genetic and specific environmental effects best explained the covariation between the latent factors for male and female twin pairs alike. The EPQ and TPQ dimensions accounted for moderate to large proportions of the genetic variance (40-76%) in the IPSM sub-scales, while most of the non-shared environment variance was unique to the IPSM sub-scales.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1039-1051
Number of pages13
JournalPersonality and Individual Differences
Volume31
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2001

Keywords

  • Depression
  • Genes
  • Personality
  • Twins

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