The feasibility of using metacognitive strategy training to improve cognitive performance and neural connectivity in women with chemotherapy-induced cognitive impairment

Timothy J. Wolf, Meghan Doherty, Dorina Kallogjeri, Rebecca S. Coalson, Joyce Nicklaus, Cynthia X. Ma, Bradley L. Schlaggar, Jay Piccirillo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the feasibility and preliminary effect of metacognitive strategy training (MCST) on cognitive performance and on neural connectivity in the frontoparietal network in women with chemotherapy-induced cognitive impairment (CICI) following treatment for breast cancer. Methods: A single-group pre/post study was conducted. After completing the baseline assessment battery and neuroimaging, the participants completed a 12-session MCST intervention. Following the completion of the intervention, the subjects completed the same assessment battery and neuroimaging as was completed at baseline within 4 weeks after the intervention. The key inclusion/exclusion criteria for this study were: completed chemotherapy for treatment of breast cancer, no other neurological or psychiatric diagnoses, self-reported CICI, and no contraindications to the use of MRI. Results: MCST had a small-to-large positive effect on all primary (cognitive) and secondary (quality of life and psychosocial) behavioral outcome measures (r = -0.12 to -0.88). There was also a positive change in functional connectivity in a frontoparietal cognitive control network connection in 6 of the 10 subjects, which was correlated to changes in the behavioral measures. Conclusions: This study found that MCST was associated with a positive effect on cognitive performance and neural connectivity in women with CICI following treatment for breast cancer.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)143-152
Number of pages10
JournalOncology (Switzerland)
Volume91
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2016

Keywords

  • Breast cancer
  • Cancer survivorship
  • Metacognitive strategy training
  • Neuroimaging
  • Occupational therapy

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