The Epidemiology and Pathogenesis and Treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections: An Update

Dan Reynolds, Marin Kollef

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen that is a common cause of nosocomial infections, particularly pneumonia, infection in immunocompromised hosts, and in those with structural lung disease such as cystic fibrosis. Epidemiological studies have identified increasing trends of antimicrobial resistance, including multi-drug resistant (MDR) isolates in recent years. P. aeruginosa has several virulence mechanisms that increase its ability to cause severe infections, such as secreted toxins, quorum sensing and biofilm formation. Management of P. aeruginosa infections focuses on prevention when possible, obtaining cultures, and prompt initiation of antimicrobial therapy, occasionally with combination therapy depending on the clinical scenario to ensure activity against P. aeruginosa. Newer anti-pseudomonal antibiotics are available and are increasingly being used in the management of MDR P. aeruginosa.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2117-2131
Number of pages15
JournalDrugs
Volume81
Issue number18
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2021

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