The effect of head orientation on subarachnoid cerebrospinal fluid distribution and its implications for neurophysiological modulation and recording techniques

Janine D. Bijsterbosch, Kwang Hyuk Lee, Michael D. Hunter, Iain D. Wilkinson, Tom Farrow, Anthony T. Barker, Peter W.R. Woodruff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Gravitational forces may lead to local changes in subarachnoid cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) layer thickness, which has important implications for neurophysiological modulation and recording techniques. This study examines the effect of gravitational pull associated with different head positions on the distribution of subarachnoid CSF using structural magnetic resonance imaging. Images of seven subjects in three different positions (supine, left lateral and prone) were statistically compared. Results suggest that subarachnoid CSF volume decreases on the side of the head closest to the ground, due to downward brain movement with gravity. These findings warrant future research into currently unexplored gravitation-induced changes in regional subarachnoid CSF thickness.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)N9-N14
JournalPhysiological Measurement
Volume34
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2013

Keywords

  • cerebrospinal fluid
  • electroencephalography
  • gravity
  • head orientation
  • transcranial magnetic stimulation

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