The duration of intrapartum supplemental oxygen administration and umbilical cord oxygen content

Virginia Y. Watkins, Shannon Martin, George A. Macones, Methodius G. Tuuli, Alison G. Cahill, Nandini Raghuraman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Maternal oxygen (O2) administration is a commonly performed intrauterine resuscitation technique though to improve fetal oxygenation. However, hyperoxygenation is known to be harmful in both neonates and adults. Currently, there are no formal recommendations on whether a certain dose or duration of O2 may be most helpful in improving umbilical cord gases or neonatal outcomes. Objective: We tested the hypothesis that prolonged supplemental O2 exposure during labor is associated with increased umbilical cord O2 concentrations. Study Design: This was a planned secondary analysis of a randomized noninferiority trial comparing O2 with room air in laboring patients. Patients were randomized to receive either 10 L/min O2 or room air at any point during active labor when they developed a category II fetal heart tracing that would otherwise require resuscitation. The primary outcome variable for this analysis was partial pressure of O2 in the umbilical vein. The secondary outcome variable was partial pressure of O2 in the umbilical artery. These outcome variables were compared between patients with short durations of O2 exposure and those with long durations of O2 exposure, defined as <75th percentile and ≥75th percentile of duration, respectively. The outcomes were also compared among the groups that received room air, O2 for short durations, and O2 for long durations. Results: Among the 99 patients with paired and validated cord gases who were included in this analysis, the partial pressure of O2 in the umbilical vein was significantly lower in patients who received O2 supplementation for longer durations than in those who received O2 for shorter durations (median interquartile range 25.5 [21.5–33] vs 32.5 [26.5–37.5] mm Hg; P<.03). There was no difference in the partial pressure of O2 in the umbilical artery or other cord gases between the short and long duration O2 supplementation groups. Other methods of intrauterine resuscitation were similar between the short and long duration O2 supplementation groups. There was no difference in the partial pressure of O2 in the umbilical artery or in the umbilical vein when the room air, short duration O2 supplementation, and long duration O2 supplementation groups were compared. Conclusion: Longer durations of O2 exposure are not associated with a higher partial pressure of O2 in the umbilical cord. In fact, patients with longer durations of O2 exposure had lower partial pressure of O2 in the umbilical vein, suggesting impaired placental O2 transfer with prolonged O2 exposure.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)440.e1-440.e7
JournalAmerican journal of obstetrics and gynecology
Volume223
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2020

Keywords

  • Oxygen
  • pO
  • resuscitation
  • room air

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The duration of intrapartum supplemental oxygen administration and umbilical cord oxygen content'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this