The clinical frailty scale predicts 1-year mortality in emergency department patients aged 65 years and older

Marco Rueegg, Søren Kabell Nissen, Mikkel Brabrand, Tobias Kaeppeli, Thomas Dreher, Christopher R. Carpenter, Roland Bingisser, Christian H. Nickel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To validate the Clinical Frailty Scale (CFS) for prediction of 1-year all-cause mortality in the emergency department (ED) and compare its performance to the Emergency Severity Index (ESI). Methods: Prospective cohort study at the ED of a tertiary care center in Northwestern Switzerland. All patients aged ≥65 years were included from March 18 to May 20, 2019, after informed consent. Frailty status was assessed using CFS, excluding level 9 (palliative). Acuity level was assessed using ESI. Both CFS and ESI were adjusted for age, sex and presenting condition in multivariable logistic regression. Prognostic performance was assessed for discrimination and calibration separately. Estimates were internally validated by Bootstrapping. Restricted mean survival time (RMST) was determined for all levels of CFS. Results: In the final study population of 2191 patients, 1-year all-cause mortality was 17% (n = 372). RMST values ranged from 219 days for CFS 8 to 365 days for CFS 1. The adjusted CFS model had an area under receiver operating characteristic of 0.767 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.741–0.793), compared to 0.703 (95% CI: 0.673–0.732) for the adjusted ESI model. Conclusion: The CFS predicts 1-year all-cause mortality for older ED patients and predicts survival time in a graded manner. The CFS is superior to the ESI when adjusted for age, sex, and presenting condition.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)572-580
Number of pages9
JournalAcademic Emergency Medicine
Volume29
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2022

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