The bidirectional association between daytime affect and nighttime sleep in youth with anxiety and depression

Jennifer C. Cousins, Diana J. Whalen, Ronald E. Dahl, Erika E. Forbes, Thomas M. Olino, Neal D. Ryan, Jennifer S. Silk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

90 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective This study examines relationships between affect and sleep in youth with affective disorders using ecological momentary assessment (EMA).Method sParticipants included 94 youth, ages 8-16 (M=11.73, 53 female) years with an anxiety disorder only (n=23), primary major depressive disorder (with and without a secondary anxiety diagnoses; n=42), and healthy controls (n=29). A cell phone EMA protocol assessed affect and actigraphy measured sleep.Results The patterns of bidirectional relationships between affect and sleep differed across diagnostic groups. Higher daytime positive affect and positive to negative affect ratios were associated with more time in bed during the subsequent night for youth with primary depression and less time in bed for youth with anxiety only. More time asleep was associated with more positive affect for both diagnostic groups the following day.Conclusions This relationship may be important to consider in the treatment of youth affective disorders.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)969-979
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of pediatric psychology
Volume36
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2011

Keywords

  • adolescents
  • anxiety
  • children
  • depression
  • sleep

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