TELEmedicine as an intervention for sepsis in emergency departments: a multicenter, comparative effectiveness study (TELEvISED Study)

Nicholas M. Mohr, Karisa K. Harland, Uche E. Okoro, Brian M. Fuller, Kalyn Campbell, Morgan B. Swanson, Stephen Q. Simpson, Edith A. Parker, Luke J. Mack, Amanda Bell, Katie Dejong, Brett Faine, Anne Zepeski, Keith Mueller, Elizabeth Chrischilles, Christopher R. Carpenter, Michael P. Jones, Marcia M. Ward

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Sepsis is a life-threatening infection that affects over 1.7 million Americans annually. Low-volume rural hospitals have worse sepsis outcomes, and emergency department (ED)-based telemedicine (tele-ED) has been one promising strategy for improving rural sepsis care. The objective of this study is to evaluate the impact of tele-ED consultation on sepsis care and outcomes in rural ED patients. The TELEvISED study is a multicenter (n = 25) retrospective propensity-matched comparative effectiveness study of tele-ED care for rural sepsis patients in a mature tele-ED network. Telemedicine-exposed patients will be matched with non telemedicine patients using a propensity score to predict tele-ED use. The primary outcome is 28-day hospital free days, and secondary outcomes include adherence with guidelines, mortality and organ failure. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT04441944.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)77-91
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Comparative Effectiveness Research
Volume10
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2021

Keywords

  • emergency service
  • hospital
  • hospitals
  • rural
  • sepsis
  • telemedicine

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