Tc-99m-DTPA aerosol and radioactive gases compared as adjuncts to perfusion scintigraphy in patients with suspected pulmonary embolism

P. O. Alderson, D. R. Biello, A. Gottschalk, P. B. Hoffer, S. A. Kroop, M. E. Lee, L. Ramanna, B. A. Siegel, A. D. Waxman

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71 Scopus citations

Abstract

To evaluate the clinical utility of improved methods for radioaerosol inhalation imaging, we obtained preperfusion radioaerosol images in 107 patients (mean age = 62 years), who were referred for evaluation of suspected pulmonary embolism (PE). For each patient, we compared six-view aerosol images with accompanying perfusion scans and chest radiographs and with Xenon-133 (Xe-133) or Krypton-81m (Kr-81m) studies. Four observers at four different institutions independently evaluated aerosol-perfusion and gas-perfusion pairs, classifying the probability of PE as low, high, or indeterminate. The radioaerosol images were good to excellent in quality; excessive central deposition of activity was infrequent and did not interfere with image interpretation. The aerosol-perfusion studies showed 86% agreement with Xe-133 perfusion interpretations (n = 299) and 80% agreement with Kr-81m perfusion interpretations (n = 99). These rates of agreement were comparable with those of intraobserver agreement for gas-to-gas and aerosol-to-aerosol comparisons, and higher than interobserver agreement rates. In a limited number (n = 9) of angiographically documented cases, aerosol-perfusion and gas-perfusion studies provided accurate and equivalent diagnoses. The results suggest that radioaerosol inhalation studies, performed with improved nebulizers, are diagnostically equivalent to ventilation imaging as an adjunct to perfusion scintigraphy in evaluating patients with suspected PE.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)515-521
Number of pages7
JournalRadiology
Volume153
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1984

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