Synaptic Ribbons Require Ribeye for Electron Density, Proper Synaptic Localization, and Recruitment of Calcium Channels

Caixia Lv, William J. Stewart, Otar Akanyeti, Courtney Frederick, Jie Zhu, Joseph Santos-Sacchi, Lavinia Sheets, James C. Liao, David Zenisek

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Scopus citations

Abstract

Synaptic ribbons are structures made largely of the protein Ribeye that hold synaptic vesicles near release sites in non-spiking cells in some sensory systems. Here, we introduce frameshift mutations in the two zebrafish genes encoding for Ribeye and thus remove Ribeye protein from neuromast hair cells. Despite Ribeye depletion, vesicles collect around ribbon-like structures that lack electron density, which we term "ghost ribbons." Ghost ribbons are smaller in size but possess a similar number of smaller vesicles and are poorly localized to synapses and calcium channels. These hair cells exhibit enhanced exocytosis, as measured by capacitance, and recordings from afferent neurons post-synaptic to hair cells show no significant difference in spike rates. Our results suggest that Ribeye makes up most of the synaptic ribbon density in neuromast hair cells and is necessary for proper localization of calcium channels and synaptic ribbons.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2784-2795
Number of pages12
JournalCell Reports
Volume15
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 21 2016
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Exocytosis
  • Hair cell
  • Hearing
  • Retina
  • Synaptic ribbon
  • Vestibular system

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    Lv, C., Stewart, W. J., Akanyeti, O., Frederick, C., Zhu, J., Santos-Sacchi, J., Sheets, L., Liao, J. C., & Zenisek, D. (2016). Synaptic Ribbons Require Ribeye for Electron Density, Proper Synaptic Localization, and Recruitment of Calcium Channels. Cell Reports, 15(12), 2784-2795. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.celrep.2016.05.045