Symptoms that remain after depression treatment in patients with coronary heart disease

Robert M. Carney, Kenneth E. Freedland, Brian C. Steinmeyer, Michael W. Rich

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: Symptoms which commonly remain after treatment for major depression increase the risk of relapse and recurrence in medically well patients. The same symptoms predict major adverse cardiac events in observational studies of patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and predictors of residual depression symptoms in depressed patients with CHD-. Methods: Beck Depression Inventory-II data from two randomized clinical trials and an uncontrolled treatment study of depression in patients with CHD were combined to determine the prevalence and predictors of residual symptoms. Results: Loss of energy, loss of pleasure, loss of interest, fatigue, and difficulty concentrating were the five most common residual symptoms in all three studies. They are also among the most common residual symptoms in medically well patients who are treated for depression. The severity of pre-treatment anxiety predicted the post-treatment persistence of all these symptoms except for loss of energy. Conclusions: The most common post-treatment residual symptoms found in this study of patients with coronary heart disease and comorbid major depression are the same as those that have been reported in previous studies of medically-well depressed patients. This suggests that they may be resistant to standard depression treatments across diverse patient populations. More effective treatments for these symptoms are needed.

Original languageEnglish
Article number111122
JournalJournal of Psychosomatic Research
Volume165
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2023

Keywords

  • Antidepressive agents
  • Cognitive behavior therapy
  • Coronary heart disease
  • Depression
  • Depressive disorders

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