Symptom Duration in Patients With Urologic Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome is not Associated With Pain Severity, Nonurologic Syndromes and Mental Health Symptoms: A Multidisciplinary Approach to the Study of Chronic Pelvic Pain Network Study

MAPP Research Network

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate if patients with urologic chronic pelvic pain syndromes (UCPPS) with longer duration of symptoms experience more severe pain and urologic symptoms, higher rates of chronic overlapping pain conditions (COPC) and psychosocial comorbidities than those with a more recent onset of the condition. We evaluated cross-sectional associations between UCPPS symptom duration and (1) symptom severity, (2) presence of COPC, and (3) mental health comorbidities. Methods: We analyzed baseline data from the Multidisciplinary Approach to the Study of Chronic Pelvic Pain. Symptom severity, COPC, and mental health comorbidities were compared between patients with symptom duration of < 2 vs ≥ 2 years. Symptom severity was assessed by the Genitourinary Pain Index, the Interstitial Cystitis Symptom and Problem Index, and Likert scales for pelvic pain, urgency, and frequency. Depression and anxiety were evaluated with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and stress with the Perceived Stress Scale. Results: Males (but not females) with UCPPS symptom duration ≥2 years had more severe symptoms than those with <2 years. Participants with short (<2 years) and longer (≥2 years) symptom duration were as likely to experience COPC. Conclusion: Longer UCPPS symptom duration was associated with more severe symptoms only in limited patient subpopulations. Symptom duration was not associated with risk for COPC or mental health comorbidities. Females with longer UCPPS duration had decreased distress, but the association was largely attributable to age.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)14-22
Number of pages9
JournalUrology
Volume124
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2019

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Symptom Duration in Patients With Urologic Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome is not Associated With Pain Severity, Nonurologic Syndromes and Mental Health Symptoms: A Multidisciplinary Approach to the Study of Chronic Pelvic Pain Network Study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this