Survival with Favorable Neurologic Outcome and Quality of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Following In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Children with Cardiac Disease Compared with Noncardiac Disease∗

Myke Federman, Robert M. Sutton, Ron W. Reeder, Tageldin Ahmed, Michael J. Bell, Robert A. Berg, Robert Bishop, Matthew Bochkoris, Candice Burns, Joseph A. Carcillo, Todd C. Carpenter, J. Michael Dean, J. Wesley Diddle, Richard Fernandez, Ericka L. Fink, Deborah Franzon, Aisha H. Frazier, Stuart H. Friess, Kathryn Graham, Mark HallDavid A. Hehir, Christopher M. Horvat, Leanna L. Huard, Theresa Kirkpatrick, Tensing Maa, Laura A. Maitoza, Arushi Manga, Patrick S. McQuillen, Kathleen L. Meert, Ryan W. Morgan, Peter M. Mourani, Vinay M. Nadkarni, Daniel Notterman, Chella A. Palmer, Murray M. Pollack, Anil Sapru, Carleen Schneiter, Matthew P. Sharron, Neeraj Srivastava, Bradley Tilford, Shirley Viteri, David Wessel, Heather A. Wolfe, Andrew R. Yates, Athena F. Zuppa, Maryam Y. Naim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To assess associations between outcome and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) quality for in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) in children with medical cardiac, surgical cardiac, or noncardiac disease. DESIGN: Secondary analysis of a multicenter cluster randomized trial, the ICU-RESUScitation Project (NCT02837497, 2016-2021). SETTING: Eighteen PICUs. PATIENTS: Children less than or equal to 18 years old and greater than or equal to 37 weeks postconceptual age receiving chest compressions (CC) of any duration during the study. INTERVENTIONS: None MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Of 1,100 children with IHCA, there were 273 medical cardiac (25%), 383 surgical cardiac (35%), and 444 noncardiac (40%) cases. Favorable neurologic outcome was defined as no more than moderate disability or no worsening from baseline Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category at discharge. The medical cardiac group had lower odds of survival with favorable neurologic outcomes compared with the noncardiac group (48% vs 55%; adjusted odds ratio [aOR] [95% CI], aOR 0.59 [95% CI, 0.39-0.87], p = 0.008) and surgical cardiac group (48% vs 58%; aOR 0.64 [95% CI, 0.45-0.9], p = 0.01). We failed to identify a difference in favorable outcomes between surgical cardiac and noncardiac groups. We also failed to identify differences in CC rate, CC fraction, ventilation rate, intra-Arrest average target diastolic or systolic blood pressure between medical cardiac versus noncardiac, and surgical cardiac versus noncardiac groups. The surgical cardiac group had lower odds of achieving target CC depth compared to the noncardiac group (OR 0.15 [95% CI, 0.02-0.52], p = 0.001). We failed to identify a difference in the percentage of patients achieving target CC depth when comparing medical cardiac versus noncardiac groups. CONCLUSIONS: In pediatric IHCA, medical cardiac patients had lower odds of survival with favorable neurologic outcomes compared with noncardiac and surgical cardiac patients. We failed to find differences in CPR quality between medical cardiac and noncardiac patients, but there were lower odds of achieving target CC depth in surgical cardiac compared to noncardiac patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4-14
Number of pages11
JournalPediatric Critical Care Medicine
Volume25
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2024

Keywords

  • cardiopulmonary resuscitation
  • child
  • congenital heart disease
  • in-hospital cardiac arrest
  • infant

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