Suppression of the fibrotic encapsulation of silicone implants by inhibiting the mechanical activation of pro-fibrotic TGF-β

Nina Noskovicova, Ronen Schuster, Sander van Putten, Maya Ezzo, Anne Koehler, Stellar Boo, Nuno M. Coelho, David Griggs, Peter Ruminski, Christopher A. McCulloch, Boris Hinz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

The fibrotic encapsulation of implants involves the mechanical activation of myofibroblasts and of pro-fibrotic transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1). Here, we show that both softening of the implant surfaces and inhibition of the activation of TGF-β1 reduce the fibrotic encapsulation of subcutaneous silicone implants in mice. Conventionally stiff silicones (elastic modulus, ~2 MPa) coated with a soft silicone layer (elastic modulus, ~2 kPa) reduced collagen deposition as well as myofibroblast activation without affecting the numbers of macrophages and their polarization states. Instead, fibroblasts around stiff implants exhibited enhanced intracellular stress, increased the recruitment of αv and β1 integrins, and activated TGF-β1 signalling. In vitro, the recruitment of αv integrin to focal adhesions and the activation of β1 integrin and of TGF-β were higher in myofibroblasts grown on latency-associated peptide (LAP)-coated stiff silicones than on soft silicones. Antagonizing αv integrin binding to LAP through the small-molecule inhibitor CWHM-12 suppressed active TGF-β signalling, myofibroblast activation and the fibrotic encapsulation of stiff subcutaneous implants in mice.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1437-1456
Number of pages20
JournalNature Biomedical Engineering
Volume5
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2021

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