Supplementation of urban home visitation with a series of group meetings for parents and infants: Results of a "real-world" randomized, controlled trial

John N. Constantino, Nahid Hashemi, Ellen Solis, Tal Alon, Sandra Haley, Stephanie McClure, Nita Nordlicht, Michele A. Constantino, Julie Elmen, Vicki Kay Carlson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

26 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: Home visitation has been shown to be effective in reducing rates of child maltreatment and in enhancing psychosocial outcomes in children and their parents. Even when available, however, it is underutilized by parents in some urban settings. We tested a supplemental 10-session group intervention for its ability to increase active participation in home visitation, enhance the quality of caregiving behavior of parents, and improve social developmental outcome in children. Method: A randomized controlled design was utilized, involving two separate cohorts of parents of 3- to 18-month old infants, totaling 148 parent-child dyads. The intervention focused on practical experience in promoting parent-infant attachment relationships. Results: At 6 months follow-up, there was a substantial increase in the proportion of intervention group parents participating in home visitation, compared to parents in the control group (Fisher's exact p = .008). Parents in the intervention group exhibited a trend for improvement in their capacity to appropriately interpret infants' emotional cues (p = .08), independent of the effects of home visitation itself. Attrition in both the treatment and control groups was inversely associated with income and level of education. Conclusions: Group meetings may constitute an effective means of engaging stressed urban families in home visitation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1571-1581
Number of pages11
JournalChild Abuse and Neglect
Volume25
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001

Keywords

  • Attachment
  • Home visitation
  • Public health
  • Randomized controlled trial

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