Substance use and abuse by Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders: Preliminary results from four national epidemiologic studies

Rumi Kato Price, Nathan K. Risk, Mamie Mee Wong, Renee Storm Klingle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

89 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: The authors analyzed four recent large national surveys to assess the degree of use and abuse of a wide range of psychoactive substances across subgroups of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPIs) and in comparison with whites. Method: The surveys analyzed were the 1999 National Household Survey on Drug Abuse, the 1992 National Longitudinal Alcohol Epidemiologic Survey, and the 1995 National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health In-School and In-Home surveys. The AAPI sample sizes varied from 900 to more than 4,500 across the four surveys. Results: Among major racial groups, use of major substances is lowest for AAPIs. Among disaggregated AAPI groups, Japanese Americans have the highest substance use rates. Mixed-heritage AAPIs are at high risk for substance use, even after controlling for cultural protective factors and socioeconomic measures. Differential rates correspond to the ranking of several acculturation and socioeconomic indices. Conclusion: The results, while preliminary, point to the importance of rethinking ethnic and racial classifications for estimating substance use and abuse, for studying substance abuse problems in mixed-heritage adolescents, and for studying socioenvironmental and potentially genetic protective factors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)S39-S50
JournalPublic Health Reports
Volume117
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
StatePublished - Nov 28 2002

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Substance use and abuse by Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders: Preliminary results from four national epidemiologic studies'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this