Subjective outcome following surgical management of upper extremity neuromas

Christine B. Novak, Deborah van Vliet, Susan E. Mackinnon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

39 Scopus citations

Abstract

Our study used a telephone survey to evaluate long-term subjective outcome of 70 patients with 112 upper extremity neuromas treated surgically. The mean postinjury time before surgery was 9 years. The mean postsurgical followup was 5 years. Fifty-one of the patients were involved with workers' compensation (WC). Forty-five patients reported good relief of pain. Preoperatively, 46 patients were unemployed because of pain; following surgery 18 of these patients returned to work. Of the 54 patients taking analgesic medication preoperatively, 19 reported less and 10 reported no postoperative analgesic use. No significant difference was found in gender, postinjury time, postsurgical followup time, number of previous surgeries for pain relief, or site of nerve injury between patients who reported improvement versus no symptomatic improvement. Poor subjective outcome occurred in patients (p<.03), with 16 out of 19 of those not involved with WC reporting good pain relief as compared to 29 out of 51 of WC patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)221-226
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Hand Surgery
Volume20
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1995
Externally publishedYes

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