Stem design and dislocation after revision total hip arthroplasty: Clinical results and computer modeling

Robert L. Barrack, R. Allen Butler, Daniel R. Laster, Pamela Andrews

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

57 Scopus citations

Abstract

The effect of the size and shape of the neck and the taper of the femoral stem on dislocation rate after revision total hip arthroplasty was examined. Design I had a large (14/16), long taper with a circular neck cross-section; a fixed 42-mm offset; and a neck that was anteverted relative to the stem. Design II was characterized by a smaller (12/14), shorter taper; a trapezoidal neck cross-section; a progressive (40-50 mm) offset; and no neck anteversion relative to the stem. The stems were digitized and placed through a range of motion using virtual reality software, and the cross-sectional area of the neck, length of the taper, and total arc of motion before impingement between the neck and liner were compared. The dislocation rate at a minimum of 2 years follow-up was 15.4% (8 of 52) for design I compared with 4.3% (2 of 46) for design II. This finding was consistent with the results of computer modeling, which showed that design I had a cross-sectional area that was 32% greater and a total arc of motion that was 76% less compared with design II. The results suggest that neck and taper design may be an important factor in dislocation after revision total hip arthroplasty.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)8-12
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Arthroplasty
Volume16
Issue number8 SUPPL. 1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001

Keywords

  • Animation
  • Dislocation
  • Neck
  • Revision
  • THA
  • Taper

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