Stability of MEG for real-time neurofeedback

S. T. Foldes, R. K. Vinjamuri, W. Wang, D. J. Weber, J. L. Collinger

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Movement-related field potentials can be extracted and processed in real-time with magnetoencephalography (MEG) and used for brain machine interfacing (BMI). However, due to its immense sensitivity to magnetic fields, MEG is prone to a low signal to noise ratio. It is therefore important to collect enough initial data to appropriately characterize motor-related activity and to ensure that decoders can be built to adequately translate brain activity into BMI-device commands. This is of particular importance for therapeutic BMI applications where less time spent collecting initial open-loop data means more time for performing neurofeedback training which could potentially promote cortical plasticity and rehabilitation. This study evaluated the amount of hand-grasp movement and rest data needed to characterize sensorimotor modulation depth and build classifier functions to decode brain states in real-time. It was determined that with only five minutes of initial open-loop MEG data, decoders can be built to classify brain activity as grasp or rest in real-time with an accuracy of 846%.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication33rd Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS 2011
Pages5778-5781
Number of pages4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2011
Event33rd Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS 2011 - Boston, MA, United States
Duration: Aug 30 2011Sep 3 2011

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS
ISSN (Print)1557-170X

Conference

Conference33rd Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS 2011
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityBoston, MA
Period08/30/1109/3/11

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