Specificity of familial vulnerability for alcoholism versus major depression in men

Michael J. Lyons, Mark Schultz, Michael Neale, Kathleen Brady, Seth Eisen, Rosemary Toomey, Andrew Rhein, Stephen Faraone, Ming Tsuang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

There are various hypotheses regarding comorbidity between alcohol dependence (AD) and major depression (MD). We interviewed 3372 pairs of male twins assessing DSM-III-R MD and AD. Individuals with comorbid MD and AD exhibited greater severity of each disorder than individuals with only one. MD in one twin was associated with risk of MD alone and MD plus AD, but not AD alone in the cotwin. AD in one twin was associated with risk of AD alone and AD plus MD, but not MD alone in the cotwin. The best fitting biometrical comorbidity model was the reciprocal causation model in which AD can cause MD and vice versa. However, a model in which genetic and environmental influences on each disorder were correlated could not be definitively rejected. Our data are most consistent with a mechanism of reciprocal causation, whereby MD increases risk for AD and AD increases risk of MD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)809-817
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Nervous and Mental Disease
Volume194
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2006

Keywords

  • Alcoholism
  • Comorbidity
  • Major depression
  • Twin study

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    Lyons, M. J., Schultz, M., Neale, M., Brady, K., Eisen, S., Toomey, R., Rhein, A., Faraone, S., & Tsuang, M. (2006). Specificity of familial vulnerability for alcoholism versus major depression in men. Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 194(11), 809-817. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.nmd.0000244480.78431.49