Spatial eye–hand coordination during bimanual reaching is not systematically coded in either LIP or PRR

Eric Mooshagian, Lawrence H. Snyder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

We often orient to where we are about to reach. Spatial and temporal correlations in eye and arm movements may depend on the posterior parietal cortex (PPC). Spatial representations of saccade and reach goals preferentially activate cells in the lateral intraparietal area (LIP) and the parietal reach region (PRR), respectively. With unimanual reaches, eye and arm movement patterns are highly stereotyped. This makes it difficult to study the neural circuits involved in coordination. Here, we employ bimanual reaching to two different targets. Animals naturally make a saccade first to one target and then the other, resulting in different patterns of limb–gaze coordination on different trials. Remarkably, neither LIP nor PRR cells code which target the eyes will move to first. These results suggest that the parietal cortex plays at best only a permissive role in some aspects of eye–hand coordination and makes the role of LIP in saccade generation unclear.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)E3817-E3826
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume115
Issue number16
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 17 2018

Keywords

  • Arm movement
  • Monkey
  • Motor planning
  • Posterior parietal cortex
  • Saccade

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