Socioeconomic status, access to care, risk factor patterns, and stage at diagnosis for head and neck cancer among black and white patients

Marc A. Emerson, Douglas R. Farquhar, Nicholas R. Lenze, Siddharth Sheth, Angela L. Mazul, Adam M. Zanation, Trevor G. Hackman, Mark C. Weissler, Jose P. Zevallos, Wendell G. Yarbrough, Paul Brennan, Behnoush Abedi-Ardekani, Andrew F. Olshan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Little is known about how factors combine to influence progression of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC). We aimed to evaluate multidimensional influences of factors associated with HNSCC stage by race. Methods: Using retrospective data, patients with similar socioeconomic status (SES), access to care (travel time/distance), and behavioral risk factors (tobacco/alcohol use and dental care) were grouped by latent class analysis. Relative frequency differences (RFD) were calculated to evaluate latent classes by stage, race, and p16 status. Results: We identified three latent classes. Advanced T-stage was higher for black (RFD = +20.2%; 95% CI: −4.6 to 44.9) than white patients (RFD = +10.7%; 95% CI: 2.1–19.3) in the low-SES/high-access/high-behavioral risk class and higher for both black (RFD = +29.6%; 95% CI: 4.7–54.5) and white patients (RFD = +23.9%; 95% CI: 15.2–32.6) in the low-SES/low-access/high-behavioral risk class. Conclusion: Results suggest that SES, access to care, and behavioral risk factors combine to underly the association with advanced T-stage. Additionally, differences by race warrant further investigation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)823-834
Number of pages12
JournalHead and Neck
Volume44
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2022

Keywords

  • HPV-related cancer
  • distance to care
  • head and neck cancer
  • late stage
  • latent class analysis
  • neoplasm stage
  • racial disparities
  • socioeconomic status

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