Social network composition and sexual risk-taking among gay and bisexual men in atlanta, ga

Catherine Finneran, Rob Stephenson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Social network composition is known to effect patterns of reported sexual risk-taking among men who have sex with men (MSM); however, consensus as to the directionality and size of these effects is lacking. We examined the relationships between novel aspects of social network composition and sexual risk-taking using a crosssectional survey of 870 MSM. Social network composition was found to have mixed effects on reported sexual risktaking: Reporting proportionally more lesbian, gay, or bisexual (LGB)-identified friends and reporting friends who were on average significantly older than the respondent were both associated with reporting increased sexual risk, while reporting proportionally more LGB-identified friends in relationships and reporting a social network proportionally more aware of the respondent's homosexuality/ bisexuality were both associated with reporting decreased sexual risk. The support structures created by differing social network compositions-and particularly the presence of LGB couples-may be a potential area for targeting sexual risk-reduction interventions for MSM.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)59-68
Number of pages10
JournalAIDS and Behavior
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2014

Keywords

  • Gay
  • HIV
  • Men who have sex with men
  • Same-sex partnerships
  • Sexual risk-taking
  • Social networks

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