Significant left ventricular contribution to right ventricular systolic function

R. J. Damiano, P. La Follette, J. L. Cox, J. E. Lowe, W. P. Santamore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

173 Scopus citations

Abstract

To examine the importance of systolic ventricular interdependence on right ventricular function, we used a unique electrically isolated right ventricular free wall preparation. Double-peaked waveforms for right ventricular pressure and pulmonary arterial blood flow occurred over a wide range of pacing intervals between the left and right ventricles. One component of the waveforms could be directly related to right ventricular free wall contraction, whereas the other component was directly related to left ventricular and septal contraction. For left ventricular pressure, the left ventricular component was significantly larger than the right ventricular free wall component (92.7 ± 3.2 vs. 7.3 ± 3.2% peak-to-peak value, P < 0.01). For right ventricular pressure, the left ventricular and septal component was significantly greater than the right ventricular component (63.5 ± 10.9 vs. 36.5 ± 10.9% peak-to-peak value, P < 0.05). Similarly, for pulmonary arterial blood flow, the left ventricular component was significantly greater than the right ventricular component. When right ventricular free wall pacing stopped in diastole, 68 ± 4% of right ventricular systolic pressure and 80 ± 4% of pulmonary flow were obtained in the subsequent beat. The results of this study indicate that left ventricular contraction is very important for right ventricular developed pressure and volume outflow.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)H1514-H1524
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology
Volume261
Issue number5 30-5
StatePublished - Dec 1 1991
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Cardiac mechanics
  • Left ventricle
  • Right ventricle
  • Ventricular interdependence

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Significant left ventricular contribution to right ventricular systolic function'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this