Significance of poor patient participation in physical and occupational therapy for functional outcome and length of stay

Eric J. Lenze, Michael C. Munin, Tanya Quear, Mary Amanda Dew, Joan C. Rogers, Amy E. Begley, Charles F. Reynolds

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94 Scopus citations

Abstract

Lenze EJ, Munin MC, Quear T, Dew MA, Rogers JC, Begley AE, Reynolds CF III. Significance of poor patient participation in physical and occupational therapy for functional outcome and length of stay. Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2004;85:1599-601. To determine the frequency of poor patient participation during inpatient physical (PT) and occupational therapy (OT) sessions and to examine the influence of poor participation on functional outcome and length of stay (LOS). Prospective observational study. University-based, freestanding acute rehabilitation hospital. Two hundred forty-two inpatients, primarily elderly (age range, 20-96y), with a variety of impairment diagnoses (eg, stroke), who were admitted for inpatient rehabilitation. Not applicable. The Pittsburgh Rehabilitation Participation Scale, the 13 motor items from the FIM instrument (FIM motor), LOS, and discharge disposition. We categorized the sample into 3 groups: "good" participators were those for whom all inpatient PT and OT sessions were rated 4 or greater (n=139), "occasional poor" participators were those with less than 25% of scores rated below 4 (n=53), and "frequent poor" participators were those with 25% or more of scores rated below 4 (n=50). Change in FIM motor scores during the inpatient rehabilitation stay was significantly better for good and occasional poor participators, compared with frequent poor participators (mean FIM improvement: 23.2, 22.8, and 17.6, respectively; repeated-measures analysis of variance group by time interaction, P<.002). LOS was significantly longer for occasional poor participators, compared with good and frequent poor participators controlling for admission FIM differences (adjusted means: 13.9d, 11.0d, and 10.9d, respectively; analysis of covariance, P.001). Poor participation in therapy is common during inpatient rehabilitation and has important clinical implications, in terms of lower improvement in FIM scores and longer LOS. These results suggest that poor inpatient rehabilitation participation and its antecedents deserve further attention.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1599-1601
Number of pages3
JournalArchives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Volume85
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2004

Keywords

  • Motivation
  • Patient participation
  • Rehabilitation
  • Treatment outcome

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