Short-term results of Birmingham hip resurfacing in the United States

Denis Nam, Ryan M. Nunley, Erin L. Ruh, C. Anderson Engh, John S. Rogerson, Peter J. Brooks, Stephen J. Raterman, Edwin P. Su, Robert L. Barrack

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Previous data on the survivorship of the Birmingham Hip Resurfacing (BHR) implant have come from design surgeons and large national databases outside of the United States, and there is a lack of reported outcomes of surface replacement arthroplasty from US centers. A retrospective study was undertaken of 1271 hips treated with a BHR system (Smith & Nephew, Memphis, Tennessee) between June 2006 and September 2008 at 6 high-volume total joint centers in the United States. Demographic features, Harris Hip Score (HHS), and radiographic findings were recorded. Patients who did not have a 2-year follow-up visit were contacted by telephone. All patients were asked about complications, reoperations, or failure of the implants. Of the treated hips, 1144 (90%) had a minimum of 2 years of clinical follow-up (mean, 2.9 years; range, 1.8-4.2 years). Mean age was 52.3 years, and 75% of patients were men. Mean HHS improved from 55.8 preoperatively to 97.4 at the most recent follow-up (P<.001). There were 16 (1.4%) revisions to total hip arthroplasty (THA) for fracture (7), early dislocation (3), acetabular component malpositioning with pain (3; 1 with metallosis), infection (1), femoral loosening (1), and pseudotumor (1). There were 9 additional complications (0.8%) that did not require revision, including 3 dislocations treated with closed reduction, 2 fractures, 3 nerve injuries, and 1 pseudotumor. At 2 to 4 years of follow-up, the revision rate and the major complication rate with the BHR system were similar to those in previous reports of primary THA. Excellent clinical results were observed, but further follow-up is necessary to assess mid- and long-term results with the BHR system in US patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e715-e721
JournalOrthopedics
Volume38
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2015

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